M u s e u m  C r e a t e d  L e s s o n

Urban Wildlife Lessons : Cycle One, Two and Three

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"Musée de la nature et des sciences de Sherbrooke", Sherbrooke, Quebec

Teacher's Guide for the activities
The teacher can use the appendices in relation with the cycle and the subject he is teaching to develop one or more activities.
Each activty has a learning goal described in the appropriate cycle.
Appendix 1 : Fable Starring our Animal
Names of team members :
Who’s doing what?
Secretary (the person doing the writing) :
Spokesperson (the person who will address the teacher on the team’s behalf) :
Police officer (the person who ensures everything goes smoothly) :
Person in charge of the agenda/process (the person who ensures everything is done according to plan) :
Others :

Title of our fable ______________________________

Characters : Who are the characters in the fable? (Your animal, other animals, hunters, children, etc.)
Character’s name (description and disguise) : Played by...
Locations where your fable takes place? (City, village, woods, park, schoolyard, etc...) :
Material needed for the décor :

The action (events) : What happens in your story? (Poachers attack urban wildlife, people destroy their habitat, the city expands, animals get involved in the lives of children, etc.)

Action/Events
Description (beginning, middle, end) :

Appendix 2 : Declaration of the rights of the child
THIS DECLARATION OF THE RIGHTS OF THE CHILD to the end that he may have a happy childhood and enjoy for his own good and for the good of society the rights and freedoms herein set forth, and calls upon parents, upon men and women as individuals, and upon voluntary organizations, local authorities and national Governments to recognize these rights and strive for their observance by legislative and other measures progressively taken in accordance with the following principles.

DECLARATION OF THE RIGHTS OF THE CHILD
Adopted by UN General Assembly Resolution 1386 (XIV) of 10 December 1959
Read the complete declaration :
http://www.un.org/cyberschoolbus/humanrights/resources/child.asp
Appendix 3 : The universal declaration of human rights
Now, Therefore THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY proclaims THIS UNIVERSAL DECLARATION OF HUMAN RIGHTS as a common standard of achievement for all peoples and all nations, to the end that every individual and every organ of society, keeping this Declaration constantly in mind, shall strive by teaching and education to promote respect for these rights and freedoms and by progressive measures, national and international, to secure their universal and effective recognition and observance, both among the peoples of Member States themselves and among the peoples of territories under their jurisdiction.

Read the complete declaration :
http://www.un.org/en/documents/udhr/
Appendix 4 : Urban Wildlife Animals
Animal :

What the female is called :

What the babies are called :

Habitat :

Diet :

Length :

Weight :

Life expectancy :

Places they can be observed :

Times of the year they can be observed :

Family :
A Peregrine Falcon on a roof overhang at the Séminaire de Sherbrooke, in the heart of the city
Peregrine Falcon on a roof
For several years, two Peregrine Falcons (Falco peregrinus anatum) have honoured us with their presence by perching on the roof of the Séminaire de Sherbrooke. Although these birds prefer natural cliffs, their presence in the city is far from surprising, as the many birds that live in the area guarantee them a steady supply of food.

Sherbrooke museum of nature and science




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Learning Object Collection: Urban wildlife: Our wild neighbours
Classification
Sherbrooke museum of nature and science
© 2013, "Sherbrooke museum of nature and science". All Rights Reserved.
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Learning Object Collection: Urban wildlife: Our wild neighbours
A map showing urban sprawl
Landsat 5 image of Vancouver, Canada, August 2011
Vancouver grew from a settlement that had formed around a logging sawmill in western Canada in 1867. Today, Vancouver is a coastal seaport city with an estimated population of over 640,000. In this image Vancouver appears grey and white. Vegetation is green, water is blue and bare ground is tan. This Landsat 5 image was acquired August 7, 2011. http://visibleearth.nasa.gov/

NASA - Visible Earth




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Learning Object Collection: Urban wildlife: Our wild neighbours
Appendix 5 : Evolution of a city

Name of the city : ____________________________

For each year, describe :
Major events
Number of residents
Coexistence of wildlife and humans
Description of the city, buildings, wildlife, plants, forests, fields, special characteristics
Main industries, main trades practised

From 1500 to 1745


From 1745 to 1900


From 1900 to today
Construction plans for a bat nesting box
Construction plans for a bat nesting box
See the text “Activity: Build a bat nesting box” for more information. Using plywood or cedar, cut all pieces to size. Front: 12" x 7 1/4" Back: 14" x 7 1/4" Roof: 11" x 7 1/4" Interior divider: 9" x 7 1/4" Floor: 3 1/2" x 7 1/4" Side (2): 5 3/4" x 12" Score or scratch entryway and all inner surfaces to toughen. Entry crack 3/4" wide.

Sherbrooke museum of nature and science




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Learning Object Collection: Urban wildlife: Our wild neighbours
Raccoons feasting
Raccoons in a compost box
Raccoons in a compost box at the Sherbrooke museum of nature and science.

Sherbrooke museum of nature and science




© 2013, Marie Chapdelaine. All Rights Reserved.
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Learning Object Collection: Urban wildlife: Our wild neighbours
Appendix 6 : Diet
Based on your knowledge, research, and observations, check the correct box and provide details on the creature’s diet.


Name :....................Herbivore............Carnivore...........Insectivore.............Omnivore......Other....

Squirrel.......................O.........................O.........................O...........................O..................O......

Pigeon.........................O.........................O.........................O...........................O..................O.....

Skunk..........................O.........................O.........................O............................O.................O.....

Me...............................O.........................O.........................O............................O.................O.....
Appendix 7 : Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs
5) Self-actualization
(morality, creativity, problem solving…)

4) Esteem
(confidence, respect of others, respect by others, self-esteem)

3) Emotional needs / sense of belonging
(love, friendship, intimacy, family, sexuality)

2) Safety
(body, employment, health, property…)

1) Physiological needs
(food, water, sleep, breathing, sex)

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maslow's_hierarchy_of_needs
Appendix 8 : Impact on Iroquoian Society
From 1500 to 1745 and today


Important events :


Number of Iroquois :


Total number of residents :


Place they occupied in the territory :


Relationship with nature, proximity :


Description of the city, wildlife, plants, forests :


Lifestyle :
Appendix 9 : Plants
Explain those concepts.
Meaning and explanation

Photosynthesis :
Mineral salts :
Carbon dioxide :
Why are water, light, mineral salts, and carbon dioxide essential to plants?
Geotropism :
Hydrotropism :
Phototropism :
Interaction between humans and their milieus: Your opinion of what is currently happening in your region :
Describe the impact of human activities on your environment :
Use of resources :
Pollution :
Waste management :
Land use :
Urbanization :
Agriculture :
Appendix 10 : Science, Needs, and Presence of Urban Wildlife
Use your knowledge, observations, and research to complete this table as best you can.


What are the basic needs for the growth of a plant? You can draw a few sketches of each stage of a plant’s life.


What are the differences and similarities between the diets of domesticated and wild animals?


Describe physical characteristics that indicate an animal’s adaptation to its environment.


Describe the behaviour of an animal, with which you are familiar, to adapt to its environment.
Observation notebook of the exhibition “Urban Wildlife: Our Wild Neighbours”
Download your Observation notebook of the exhibition “Urban Wildlife: Our Wild Neighbours” on the VMC website
Download this before your next trip in town! You can find your observation notebook on the VMC site at “Urban Wildlife: Our Wild Neighbours”, on the “Games” section.

Productions Multimage




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Learning Object Collection: Urban wildlife: Our wild neighbours
Cycle One : Math
Learning goals :
• Statistics component: Formulate questions for a survey
• Describe and organize data (classify or categorize) using tables
• Interpret data using tables, bar graphs, and pictographs

The teacher guides the students in taxonomically classifying the animals living in their region (appendix 4). The students name all the animals they have seen in their town. Each student selects an animal, becomes a specialist, and creates different tables, using his/her knowledge, research, and observations as a basis.
Cycle One : Science
Learning goals :
• The transformation of living things : Name the basic needs for plant growth (water, air, light, mineral salts)
• Sources of energy for living things : Compare the nutrition of domestic animals with that of wild animals
• Systems and interaction : Interaction between living organisms and their environment – Describe the physical characteristics that demonstrate how animals adapt to their environment – Describe the behaviour of familiar animals that enable them to adapt to their environment

The teacher can present the hierarchy of needs (Appendix 7, see Ethics section).

Students can complete the sheet (Appendix 10). They can include simple drawings with their answers.
Cycle One : Ethics
Learning goals :
• The needs of humans and other living things – Name the needs shared by plants, animals, and human beings (e.g. need for food)
• Demands associated with the interdependence of humans and other living beings
• Give examples of actions that can harm living beings (e.g. hitting an animal, ripping a plant out of the soil)
• Name people or groups who take action to protect living beings (e.g. Society for the Protection of Animals)

Students compare their needs with those of plants and wildlife using Maslow’s Hierarchy (Appendix 7).
Students develop a list of rules establishing how to peacefully coexist with urban wildlife.
Students can learn more about the Society for the Protection of Animals by consulting http://www.spacanada.org/en/index.html.
Cycle One : Drama
Learning goals :
• Create a fable with continuous development, with a beginning and an ending

The teacher can present a fable from Lafontaine (or another source) and then ask the students to create and present one of their own. This activity can be done individually or in teams. The main character is to be an animal that lives in their town or village. The students should focus on coexistence and the animal’s way of surviving. (See Appendix 1.)
Cycle Two : English Communications
Learning goals :
• Observe content and how it is organized
• Select ideas, determine relevance and adequacy
• Organize ideas: Link statements with what proceeds them

The students present a town or city and its evolution during various eras. See the Society section sheets in appendices 5 and 8.
They present a fable (see Drama section).
Cycle Two : Math
Learning goals :
• Statistics component : Formulate questions for a survey
• Collect, describe, and organize data (classify or categorize) using tables
• Interpret data using tables, bar graphs, pictographs, and broken-line graphs

The teacher guides the students in taxonomically classifying the animals living in their region. The students name all the animals that they know. Each student selects an animal, becomes a specialist, and creates different tables, using his/her knowledge, research, and observations as a basis.
Note that we are proposing the same type of activity as for Cycle One, but it will inevitably involve more in-depth research and teacher expectations will be higher.
Cycle Two : Science
Learning goals :
• Matter : Characteristics of living things – Explain the basic needs of the metabolism of living things (e.g. nutrition, respiration)
• Transformations of living things : Describe the growth stages of a flowering plant. Describe the growth stages of various animals
• Energy : Explain the nutritional needs common to all animals (water, sugars, lipids, proteins, vitamins, minerals)
• Associate familiar animals with their diet (carnivorous, herbivorous, omnivorous)

After observing their environment and sharing information with their classmates, the students fill out the sheet provided (see Appendix 6).
Cycle Two : Society
Learning goals :
• Interpret a simple map : Read the title, decode the legend, read the scale
• Use the points of a compass – Use spatial reference points
Iroquoian society from 1500 to 1745:
• Indicate changes that occurred in this society during this period: Occupation of the territory
• Indicate events that marked society in this period.

Using their knowledge, observations, and research, the students complete the sheet provided (see Appendix 5).
Research tools/options: Explore Google Earth, consult various history reference books, reproduce a map of their region or city (before and after) and/or have some students make a scale model representing coexistence between humans and animals in 1500, others focusing on the years around 1745, while the last third of the group making one to reflect urban wildlife in 2013.
The teacher asks students to make a map of their town before conducting any research, and then to compare it with a real map.
Cycle Two : Ethics
Learning goal :
• Demands of belonging to a group: Name the roles and responsibilities that members of a group may assume.

The teacher asks the students to identify the different roles and responsibilities of a citizen who respects urban wildlife. Creation of posters, school newspaper, and messages to influence others to adopt behaviour that does not harm urban wildlife. (See appendices 2 and 3 to compare animal and human rights.)
Cycle Two : Visual Arts
Pedagogical intent
• Organize elements: Use methods of spatial organization, including superimposition, symmetry, and asymmetry.

After a brainstorming session, the teacher asks students to reproduce an ideal city where humans, flora, and wildlife live together in perfect harmony. They can focus on superimposition, symmetry, and asymmetry. This activity can be carried out in pairs or one at a time, with each student creating half of the work of art using the suggested methods (model, drawing, painting, and collage).

Students could sketch a nesting box for bats and make one. Teachers can refer to the proposed design for inspiration (see the Bat Nesting Box design). At this stage, links can be made with mathematics (measurements, area, volume) and science and technology (simple machines, use of tools, assembly).
Cycle Two : Drama
Learning goal :
• Use elements of the language of drama, performance techniques, styles of theatre and elements of drama : Create a fable with continuous development, a plot twist and an ending. Find several attitudes, gestures, mimicries and movements related to the character. Use in his/her creation noises and sounds related to the dramatic action and the character’s emotions.

Using the sheets in Appendix 1, the students develop a fable with the theme of urban wildlife and ideal coexistence.
Cycle Three : English Communications
Learning goals :

• Observe content and how it is organized
• Add new ideas to develop the subject matter
• Review the ideas expressed (e.g. accept, reject)

Presentation of a town or city and its evolution during three distinct eras.
See Society section: appendix 5.
Presentation of the fable. (Drama section)
Cycle Three : Math
Learning goals :

• Statistics component : Formulate questions for a survey
• Collect, describe, and organize data (classify or categorize) using tables
• Interpret data using tables, bar graphs, pictographs, broken-line graphs and circle graphs

The teacher guides the students in taxonomically classifying the animals living in their region. The students name all the animals that they know. Each student selects an animal, becomes a specialist, and creates different tables, using his/her knowledge, research, and observations as a basis (see appendix 4). Note that we are proposing the same type of activity as for cycles One and Two, but more in-depth research will inevitably be involved, and teacher expectations will be higher.
Cycle Three : Science
Learning goals :

• Energy : Describe how photosynthesis works – Distinguish between photosynthesis and respiration
• Explain how water, light, mineral salts and carbon dioxide are essential to plants
• Motion in plants: Distinguish among the three types of motion in plants (geotropism, hydrotropism, phototropism)
• Explain how the types of motion in plants enable them to meet their basic needs
• Interaction between humans and their environment: Describe the impact of human activity on the environment (e.g. use of resources, pollution, waste management, land use, urbanization, agriculture)

Using their knowledge, observations, and research (dictionary, reference texts, Internet), the students can complete Appendix 4.
They can complete Appendix 9 to create a reference document on plants.
Cycle Three : Society
Learning goals :
Canadian society from 1745 to 1980 : Indicate changes that occurred in this society during this period
• From 1820 to 1905 : Occupation of the territory, industrialization, urbanization, colonization and railway development.
• From 1905 to 1980 : Indicate changes that occurred in this society during this period (e. g. development of transportation and communications arteries, hydroelectricity, construction of hydroelectric complexes, introduction of electricity to rural areas)

Using their knowledge, observations, and research, the students can complete the sheet provided (see Appendix 5). Each student or team can present a different town with photos to demonstrate the evolution.
– The students list the changes and impact on urban wildlife.
– They study Google Earth, read, create a map of their region.
Cycle Three : Ethics
Learning goal :

• Demands of life in society : Explain how values or norms guide life in society (e. g. the value " saving the environment " encourages reduced consumption of drinking water)

The teacher asks students to create a Charter of Rights for Urban Wildlife and develop a list of exemplary values and behaviours. The students can take inspiration from the DECLARATION OF THE RIGHTS OF THE CHILD (see Appendix 2) and/or the THE UNIVERSAL DECLARATION OF HUMAN RIGHTS(see Appendix 3).
Cycle Three : Fine Arts
Learning goal :

• Organize the elements he/she has chosen

The students are asked to represent urban wildlife in part of their town, village, yard, or a green space. (Drawing or painting.)

Other activity : Sketch and construct a bat nesting box. The teacher can use the proposed plan as inspiration. Make links with Math (measurement, air, volume), Science and Technology (simple machines, use of tools, assembly).
Cycle Three : Drama
Learning goals :

• Use personal ideas inspired by a creative stimulus
• Create a fable with continuous development, a plot twist and an ending, and with discontinuous development, using tableaux

The teacher asks the students to create a fable demonstrating the coexistence of humans and animals. Each team can be responsible for a tableau. (See Appendix 1).

- Possibility of evaluating team work, cooperation and communications.
Urban wildlife: Our wild neighbours
Identifying animal species that have adapted to life in the city. Understanding how Canada has become urbanized and the consequences on wildlife. Learn the principles of urban ecology.
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Learning Object Collection: Urban wildlife: Our wild neighbours

Learning Objectives

– Identify an animal according to its taxonomic classification.
– Learn the fundamental needs of urban wildlife (water, food, and shelter).
– Landscape some of your urban property to encourage animals to live there.
– Build a bat nesting box.
– Get to know the history of urbanization in Canada.
– Understand the general impact of urban sprawl on wildlife.
– Research the evolution of a city.
– Learn the principles of urban ecology.
– Learn how to make choices leading to biodiversity.
– Understand how animals and people co-exist in the city.
– Build a model.