M u s e u m  C r e a t e d  L e s s o n

New Brunswick: Too Cool!

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New Brunswick Museum, Saint John, New Brunswick

Overview
The geologic history of New Brunswick has shaped our landscapes, communities and economy. The province as we know it was formed over the last billion years forged by moving continents, changing climates and complex geologic processes. Experience a journey through geologic time and discover how the magnificent rocks beneath us influence our lives.
New Brunswick: Too Cool!
Collect and analyze resources from New Brunswick’s geological past to enhance understanding of current climate change and the sustainability of ecosystems in the 21st century.
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Learning Object Collection: Magnificent Rocks
Lesson Plan: New Brunswick: Too Cool!
Collect and analyze resources from New Brunswick’s geological past to enhance understanding of current climate change and the sustainability of ecosystems in the 21st century.
View the Learning Object

Learning Object Collection: Magnificent Rocks
American mastodon: Mammut americanum (Kerr)
Colour image of skeleton and sketch of live mastodon
American mastodon: Mammut americanum (Kerr), Neogene, Hillsborough, New Brunswick, Collector: C. Osman, 1936. Mastodons once roamed the boreal forests of North America. The last of their kind became extinct about 10,000 years ago. Only a few mastodon fossils have been found in the Maritimes. In 1936 the ‘Hillsborough Mastodon’ was found in eastern New Brunswick. This animal likely lived more than 75,000 years ago during the last interglacial, the time between ice ages.

Collector: C. Osman

Reconstruction


© 2012, New Brunswick Museum. All Rights Reserved.
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Learning Object Collection: Magnificent Rocks
Teeth, American mastodon: Mammut americanum (Kerr)
Teeth, American mastodon: Mammut americanum (Kerr)
American mastodon: Mammut americanum (Kerr), Neogene, Hillsborough, New Brunswick, Collector: C. Osman, 1936. Mastodons and mammoths are easy to tell apart based on their teeth. Mammoth teeth have flat ridges, like a modern elephant. Mastodon teeth have rounded or pointed cusps. The name mastodon comes from the teeth, derived from the Greek words "mastos" meaning breast and odont for tooth.

Collector: C. Osman

Tooth specimen length 30 cm
NBMG 3906

© 2012, New Brunswick Museum. All Rights Reserved.
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Learning Object Collection: Magnificent Rocks
Dung ball, American mastodon: Mammut americanum (Kerr)
Colour image of fossilized gray ball
American mastodon: Mammut americanum (Kerr), Neogene, Hillsborough, New Brunswick, Collector: C. Osman, 1936. The ‘Hillsborough Mastodon’ was found with specimens identified as ‘dung balls’ composed of mud and vegetation. They have been analyzed to understand what mastodons ate.

Collector: C. Osman

Dung ball specimen width 11 cm
NBMG 3906

© 2012, New Brunswick Museum. All Rights Reserved.
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Learning Object Collection: Magnificent Rocks
Hillsborough Mastodon
Dr. Randall Miller Research Curator, Geology and Palaeontology New Brunswick Museum
New Brunswick Museum
© 2013, New Brunswick Museum. All Rights Reserved.
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Learning Object Collection: Magnificent Rocks

Learning Objectives

Curriculum Outcomes:

1. propose a course of action on social issues related to science and technology, taking into account human and environmental needs.
2. explain various ways in which natural populations are kept in equilibrium, and relate this equilibrium to the resource limits of an ecosystem
3. explain how biodiversity of an ecosystem contributes to its sustainability
4. analyze the impact of external factors on an ecosystem
5. plan changes to, predict the effects of, and analyze the impact of external factors on an ecosystem
6. select, compile, and display evidence and information from various sources, in different formats, to support a given view in a presentation about the ecosystem change
7. communicate questions, ideas, and intentions, and receive, interpret, understand, support, and respond to the ideas of others in preparing a report about ecosystem change
8. propose and defend a course of action on a multi-perspective social issue
9. gain a greater appreciation and understanding of New Brunswick geological history