Wayne McCutcheon Interview Part 5: Working with the CNIB



Entro Communications worked closely with the Canadian National Institute for the Blind (CNIB) to ensure that the signs are as legible as possible, including for people with impaired vision.

Qasim Virjee
Wayne McCutcheon, Carolina Eyzaguirre, Elise Hodson, Qasim Virjee
March 2006
CANADA Toronto Region, Ontario, Toronto Region, CANADA
© 2006, Design Exchange. All Rights Reserved.


Transcript

Entro Communications worked closely with the Canadian National Intsitute for the Blind (CNIB) to ensure that the signs are as legible as possible, including for people with impaired vision. "The thing that we followed - you know this idea of yellows for departures, greens for arrivals, whites for services – that’s been around for sometime. So the decision was made that because Toronto is a fairly international terminal, well quite an international terminal – real jumping off point, or jumping in point for a lot of countries – that we would use that system. In the early studies of it when we first designed the wayfinding project for the terminal it was all white, all the text was white. We looked at doing this thing with the yellow and green and white we actually took it to the CNIB because we had some concern with the green with the CNIB because the green is a darker colour. We wanted to make sure it was visible for the CNIB. They actually really liked it because they said it gave more definition to the lines ‘well here’s the yellow line and I know that’s departures or here’s the green line and I know that’s for departures’. The CNIB were the ones who really responded quite positively to that. Then we said let’s take it one step further. We got 200 vision-impaired people and we built sections of the terminal in the hangar. We spent two days touring them around. We had different stations – we had them look at the electronic signs and then we’d have them look at wayfinding signs. We had people changing in faces for different coloured vinyls, different things like the illuminated vs. the non-illuminated and things like that. It was really – of my whole career – that was probably one of the most enlightening two days ever. Just to see how it’s really just about the simplicity of the graphic, making sure that people who are visually impaired can understand the information."


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