Wayne McCutcheon Interview Part 6: Universal Design



Travelling to other countries can be difficult if you do not speak the language. Instead of words, graphic designers use symbols that are recognized internationally.

Qasim Virjee
Wayne McCutcheon, Carolina Eyzaguirre, Elise Hodson, Qasim Virjee
March 2006
CANADA Toronto Region, Ontario, Toronto Region, CANADA
© 2006, Design Exchange. All Rights Reserved.


Transcript

Traveling to other countries can be difficult if you do not speak the language. Instead of words, graphic designers use symbols that are recognized internationally. "We always have an arrow then a position for two pictograms and then a word. This is because ideally the pictograms are strong enough to support what that is – whether is a departure pictogram or an arrival pictogram, a washroom or things like that – so we tried to use as many universal pictograms as we could. And also for things like gate numbers we’d have an airplane taking off and then to say ‘Gates 100-120 This Way’ and we’d just say ‘100-120’ because the word ‘Gates’ needs to be translated into English and French, it doesn’t mean anything to anyone who is from another country who doesn’t understand English or French. So we said let’s just strip it down to the most basic information that you need which is the pictogram and the number."


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