"Marguerite Bourgeoys, 'Mes filles, ma joie et ma couronne'"

Painting by Antoine Plamondon (1804-1895).

Antoine PLAMONDON
Photo: Alain Comtois
1895
Oil on canvas
74 X 62.5 cm
© Maison Saint-Gabriel.


Antoine Plamondon (1804-1895)

Antoine Plamondon was born on February 29, 1804 in Ancienne-Lorette, Quebec, and died on September 4, 1895 in Neuville, Quebec. He was indebted for his early education to Vica C.-J. Brassard Descheneaux of Quebec City, who later encouraged him to become a painter. On March 1, 1819, he signed a six-year apprenticeship contract with Joseph Légaré.

The success of his first religious works and early portraits earned him the right to study in Paris, where in July 1826, he started with Jean-Baptiste Guérin, dit Paulin-Guérin, a painter in the court of Charles X. On November 8, 1830, the opening of a studio in Quebec City heralded his return. In 1846, he retired to Pointe-aux-Trembles (now Neuville, Quebec). He is remembered as a portrait artist, miniaturist, religious painter, professor of fine arts, polemicist and speaker.

The artist earned many honours, including a medal from the Société littéraire et historique de Québec for his portrait entitled Zacharie Vincent, le dernier des Hurons (private collection, Toronto) in 1838 and an award for his Chasse aux tourtes (Art Gallery of Onta Read More
Antoine Plamondon (1804-1895)

Antoine Plamondon was born on February 29, 1804 in Ancienne-Lorette, Quebec, and died on September 4, 1895 in Neuville, Quebec. He was indebted for his early education to Vica C.-J. Brassard Descheneaux of Quebec City, who later encouraged him to become a painter. On March 1, 1819, he signed a six-year apprenticeship contract with Joseph Légaré.

The success of his first religious works and early portraits earned him the right to study in Paris, where in July 1826, he started with Jean-Baptiste Guérin, dit Paulin-Guérin, a painter in the court of Charles X. On November 8, 1830, the opening of a studio in Quebec City heralded his return. In 1846, he retired to Pointe-aux-Trembles (now Neuville, Quebec). He is remembered as a portrait artist, miniaturist, religious painter, professor of fine arts, polemicist and speaker.

The artist earned many honours, including a medal from the Société littéraire et historique de Québec for his portrait entitled Zacharie Vincent, le dernier des Hurons (private collection, Toronto) in 1838 and an award for his Chasse aux tourtes (Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto) at the provincial exhibition in Quebec City in 1850. He was elected Honorary Vice-President of the Royal Canadian Academy in 1880, and took part in the inaugural exhibition. The known body of work of Antoine Plamondon numbers more than 400 paintings.

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The life and work of Marguerite Bourgeoys reveal the personality of a woman who was both realistic and mystical. She arrived in Canada just as Montreal was being founded, and sought solutions suited to building a new country; she was an intrepid pioneer. In this country, she supported the settlers, welcomed the Filles du Roi, organized marriage preparation courses long before the concept was invented and devoted much energy to educating women, because she placed great value on the family. In 1653, she began her life’s love, teaching. To ensure the continuation of her work, she founded a community of "secular sisters," the Soeurs de la Congrégation de Notre-Dame, at a time when religious life for women was limited to cloistered communities. On October 31, 1982, Marguerite Bourgeoys became the first woman in Canada to be canonized.

© 1997, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

"L'Acadienne"

Painting by Alma Buote (1894-1966).

Alma BUOTE
Photo: Noëlla Richard
1914
Oil on canvas
62.5cm x 87.5cm
© Acadian Museum of Prince Edward Island.


Alma Buote (1894-1966)

Buote, Alma. Tignish, Prince Edward Island, 1894-1966. Daughter of one of the founders of the first French-language weekly newspaper on the Island, Alma Buote’s talent drew early notice from those around her. As a student in Sister Marie de Lorette’s art class, she won first prize in oil painting in a field of 50 competitors, at the tender age of 14. In 1915, the Buote family moved to Trois-Rivières, Quebec to raise foxes. Alma set up her studio there until 1930, when the fox farm shut down.

She and her mother then moved to New York City, where she accepted a position drawing artificial limbs for a medical company. During the Depression, she opened a studio on Fifth Avenue, where she produced women’s and children’s fashion drawings. Throughout her life, she produced greeting cards. She also made women’s hats, painted plates and sold artist’s supplies. After she returned to the Island in 1958, she opened a pharmacy.

Toward the end of her life, she was a director of the Tignish Arts Foundation, gave drawing courses and was a correspondent for three news Read More
Alma Buote (1894-1966)

Buote, Alma. Tignish, Prince Edward Island, 1894-1966. Daughter of one of the founders of the first French-language weekly newspaper on the Island, Alma Buote’s talent drew early notice from those around her. As a student in Sister Marie de Lorette’s art class, she won first prize in oil painting in a field of 50 competitors, at the tender age of 14. In 1915, the Buote family moved to Trois-Rivières, Quebec to raise foxes. Alma set up her studio there until 1930, when the fox farm shut down.

She and her mother then moved to New York City, where she accepted a position drawing artificial limbs for a medical company. During the Depression, she opened a studio on Fifth Avenue, where she produced women’s and children’s fashion drawings. Throughout her life, she produced greeting cards. She also made women’s hats, painted plates and sold artist’s supplies. After she returned to the Island in 1958, she opened a pharmacy.

Toward the end of her life, she was a director of the Tignish Arts Foundation, gave drawing courses and was a correspondent for three newspapers in French and English. She died in 1966 from complications of a cancerous ulcer.

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At the age of 20, Alma Buote painted L’Acadienne. Based on the paintings that remain in Tignish, this period, from 1908 to 1914, was the most prolific in her career. The woman in the painting is dressed in her Sunday best, rather more elegantly than a typical Acadian woman of her day. Some people compare this work with Whistler’s Portrait of my mother, because of the similarities of subject and profile.

© 1997, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

Grand portrait

Painting by Philomène Belliveau (1854-1940).

Philomène BELLIVEAU
Photo: Donald Savoie
c. 1900
Charcoal
44 x 54 cm
© Musée acadien de l'Université de Moncton.


Philomène Belliveau (1854-1940)

Philomène Belliveau was born in 1854 at Memramcook, New Brunswick. She obtained a general education at Reed’s Castle (the Convent of the Sisters of Sacré Cœur) in Saint John. In 1889, she travelled to Boston take courses in drawing and painting. Her pastel drawings caught the eye of politicians and members of the clergy, and were in great demand by 1891. Many references in newspapers of the day confirm not only her popularity but also her talent. After she married Judge Garon in Montreal (1904), she lived in Shediac and Rimouski. She travelled to Europe in 1925. She died in Rimouski in 1940.

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Before the invention of photography, portraits were painted or drawn. The popularity of drawn portraits to decorate the walls of homes persisted long after the advent of the camera, right into the 1920s and 1930s. This charcoal portrait, dating from the end of the last century, was probably drawn from a small photograph or from the live model.
Philomène Belliveau (1854-1940)

Philomène Belliveau was born in 1854 at Memramcook, New Brunswick. She obtained a general education at Reed’s Castle (the Convent of the Sisters of Sacré Cœur) in Saint John. In 1889, she travelled to Boston take courses in drawing and painting. Her pastel drawings caught the eye of politicians and members of the clergy, and were in great demand by 1891. Many references in newspapers of the day confirm not only her popularity but also her talent. After she married Judge Garon in Montreal (1904), she lived in Shediac and Rimouski. She travelled to Europe in 1925. She died in Rimouski in 1940.

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Before the invention of photography, portraits were painted or drawn. The popularity of drawn portraits to decorate the walls of homes persisted long after the advent of the camera, right into the 1920s and 1930s. This charcoal portrait, dating from the end of the last century, was probably drawn from a small photograph or from the live model.

© 1997, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

Learning Objectives

The learner will:

  • Understand that art can influence and reflect culture by conveying social and ethical issues
  • Be aware that the creative process is influenced by personal experience.
  • Understand that our reaction to art is based on our own experiences
  • Be aware of the diversity of Francophone art across Canada
  • Develop an appreciation of historical and contemporary Francophone art in Canada
  • Recognize the role of the curator in choosing, researching and interpreting art for exhibition

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