Formed at Baginton, Warwickshire, England, on March 1, 1941, No. 403 (Fighter) Squadron flew over 13,000 operational sorties during the Second World War. The squadron was credited with 123 victories (plus seven others shared and ten "probables") and seventy-two damaged enemy aircraft (plus one other shared). Their last sortie, as shown in the photographs, was flown out of Soltau, Germany, in July 1945. No. 403 Squadron first flew the Curtiss Tomahawk Mk.1 (P-40B) fighter and, later, a variety of types of Supermarine Spitfires. On July 10, 1945, the squadron was disbanded in Passburg, Germany.
Formed at Baginton, Warwickshire, England, on March 1, 1941, No. 403 (Fighter) Squadron flew over 13,000 operational sorties during the Second World War. The squadron was credited with 123 victories (plus seven others shared and ten "probables") and seventy-two damaged enemy aircraft (plus one other shared). Their last sortie, as shown in the photographs, was flown out of Soltau, Germany, in July 1945. No. 403 Squadron first flew the Curtiss Tomahawk Mk.1 (P-40B) fighter and, later, a variety of types of Supermarine Spitfires. On July 10, 1945, the squadron was disbanded in Passburg, Germany.

© 2002, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

The ground crew homeward bound

Last Sortie SQN: This SQN would fly over 13,000 operational sorties AND account for 123 victories . They were disbanded in 1945.

Unknown
Canadian Forces Base Gagetown Military Museum.

Photograph
© Canadian Forces Base Gagetown Military Museum.


Pilot preparing for last takoff

Last Sortie SQN: This SQN would fly over 13,000 operational sorties AND account for 123 victories . They were disbanded in 1945.

Unknown
Canadian Forces Base Gagetown Military Museum.

© Canadian Forces Base Gagetown Military Museum.


The Last take off of No. 403 Squadron

The Last take off of No. 403 Squadron

Canadian Forces Base Gagetown Military Museum

© Canadian Forces Base Gagetown Military Museum.


Last Briefing

Last Sortie SQN: This SQN would fly over 13,000 operational sorties AND account for 123 victories . They were disbanded in 1945.

Canadian Forces Base Gagetown Military Museum.

© Canadian Forces Base Gagetown Military Museum.


Navigating the skies over wartime Europe, particularly during nighttime bombing raids, was never an easy task. The "Gee" box was designed to help the navigator in directing his pilot to the target and back home again. Using a network of pulse-phasing ground radar stations whose signals were detected by the receiver, then aligned and measured, the navigator could plot the aircraft’s position on a grid chart, thus forming an accurate picture of his actual location. The codename "Gee" was derived from the first letter in "GRID".
Navigating the skies over wartime Europe, particularly during nighttime bombing raids, was never an easy task. The "Gee" box was designed to help the navigator in directing his pilot to the target and back home again. Using a network of pulse-phasing ground radar stations whose signals were detected by the receiver, then aligned and measured, the navigator could plot the aircraft’s position on a grid chart, thus forming an accurate picture of his actual location. The codename "Gee" was derived from the first letter in "GRID".

© 2002, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

Navigation Tool

The introduction of the Gee Box into Bomber aircraft during the Second World War proved an important advance for the Allies, allowing navigator's to plot an aircraft's course on a grid map. The codename "GEE" was derived from the first letter in the word GRID.

RCAF Memorial Museum

© RCAF Memorial Museum.


Proudly hanging from the balcony of the 1 Canadian Air Division Headquarters atrium in Winnipeg are laid-up Colours for Nos. 421, 422 and 450 Squadrons. All of these units have been disbanded and remain inactive to this day. The "400 Series" Squadron numbering system was a product of the Second World War. Today the numbering system continues as a reminder of our relationship to the Royal Air Force and cooperation with our Commonwealth Allies during the Second World War.
Proudly hanging from the balcony of the 1 Canadian Air Division Headquarters atrium in Winnipeg are laid-up Colours for Nos. 421, 422 and 450 Squadrons. All of these units have been disbanded and remain inactive to this day. The "400 Series" Squadron numbering system was a product of the Second World War. Today the numbering system continues as a reminder of our relationship to the Royal Air Force and cooperation with our Commonwealth Allies during the Second World War.

© 2002, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

Disbanded Squadron Colours

Squadron Colours.

Unknown

© Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada, 2001


Learning Objectives

The learner will:
  • Develop an understanding of the participation and role of Canada’s Air Force in the World War II
  • Examine the contributions, sacrifices and experiences of individuals who participated in military events during World War II
  • Identify key locations in which Canada’s Air Force operated during World War II
  • Evaluate the weapons and technology used by the Canadian Air Force

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