Fighter Pilot Uniform

Mannequin dressed as a fighter pilot WWII and wearing tunic belonging to Wing Commander Hugh Gorefroy former CO OF (of) 403 SQN.

Canadian Forces Base Gagetown Military Museum

© Canadian Forces Base Gagetown Military Museum


This mannequin of a Canadian fighter pilot during the Second World War clearly shows the equipment each pilot carried. This included, in addition to uniform and boots, flashlights, a life jacket, an oxygen mask, a flying helmet, goggles and a long scarf.
This mannequin of a Canadian fighter pilot during the Second World War clearly shows the equipment each pilot carried. This included, in addition to uniform and boots, flashlights, a life jacket, an oxygen mask, a flying helmet, goggles and a long scarf.

© 2002, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

Flags or Colours have been used from earliest times to identify military groups; their main purpose, historically, being to provide a rallying point for a unit in battle. Queen’s Regulations specify that retired Colours must be laid up in a sacred building and remain the property of the crown. In placing the Regimental Colour of the Royal Canadian Air Force in 1 Canadian Air Division Headquarters, Canada is following the British custom, which is to leave the Colours where they are first laid "until they turn to dust".
Flags or Colours have been used from earliest times to identify military groups; their main purpose, historically, being to provide a rallying point for a unit in battle. Queen’s Regulations specify that retired Colours must be laid up in a sacred building and remain the property of the crown. In placing the Regimental Colour of the Royal Canadian Air Force in 1 Canadian Air Division Headquarters, Canada is following the British custom, which is to leave the Colours where they are first laid "until they turn to dust".

© 2002, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

Flags

Regimental Colours of The Royal Canadian Air Force.

Canadian Heritage Information Network.

© Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada, 2001


Aircrew often carried good luck charms with them on missions. This doll was one such charm. Made by an airwoman in the Women’s Auxiliary Air Force, the doll was hung above the navigator’s table and was used as a pencil holder.
Aircrew often carried good luck charms with them on missions. This doll was one such charm. Made by an airwoman in the Women’s Auxiliary Air Force, the doll was hung above the navigator’s table and was used as a pencil holder.

© 2002, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

Navigator Table Doll

Made by members of the Women's Auxiliary Air Force, these navigator's dolls were treasured good luck charms and more practically pencil holders.

RCAF Memorial Museum.

© RCAF Memorial Museum.


Learning Objectives

The learner will:
  • Develop an understanding of the participation and role of Canada’s Air Force in the World War II
  • Examine the contributions, sacrifices and experiences of individuals who participated in military events during World War II
  • Evaluate the weapons and technology used by the Canadian Air Force

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