M u s e u m  C r e a t e d  L e s s o n

New Brunswick Communities & Their Geological Stories

nbmmnb Add to My Content  Add this lesson to My Content  
New Brunswick Museum, Saint John, New Brunswick

Overview
The geologic history of New Brunswick has shaped our landscapes, communities and economy. The province as we know it was formed over the last billion years forged by moving continents, changing climates and complex geologic processes. Experience a journey through geologic time and discover how the magnificent rocks beneath us influence our lives.

Explore the geologic formations that drive our economy and stories of geology in our communities. From the stone used to rebuild Saint John after the Great Fire of 1877 to sand found on New Brunswick golf courses to natural gas, our connection to geology surrounds us. You may be surprised to learn how geology influences our sense of place and our lives in New Brunswick.
New Brunswick Communities & Their Geological Stories
Students will research the role that geology has played in the economic and cultural development of their communities.
View the Learning Object

Learning Object Collection: Magnificent Rocks
Lesson Plan: New Brunswick Communities & Their Geological Stories
Students will research the role that geology has played in the economic and cultural development of their communities.
View the Learning Object

Learning Object Collection: Magnificent Rocks
Hole in the Wall, Grand Manan, New Brunswick
Black and white postcard of arching rock formation
postcard: Hole in the Wall, Grand Manan, New Brunswick, c. 1932. Erosion of the rocks on Grand Manan has formed many unique features. One of the best known is the ‘Hole in the Wall’ located on the east side of the island in the Cambrian volcanic rocks of the Fish Head Gabbro. Geologic study on Grand Manan goes back to 1839 when New Brunswick’s first Provincial Geologist, Abraham Gesner, visited Grand Manan Island to conduct a geological survey.

Unknown


X13877

© 2012, New Brunswick Museum. All Rights Reserved.
View the complete media file

Learning Object Collection: Magnificent Rocks
Running the Dawsonville Rapids, the Worst on the Restigouche River, New Brunswick
Black and white photograph of two men in a canoe shooting rapids
photograph: Running the Dawsonville Rapids, the Worst on the Restigouche River, New Brunswick, c. 1900. People have been travelling New Brunswick’s water highways for thousands of years. Canoeing the Restigouche River is a long tradition in northern New Brunswick. A familiar place to many who take part in this activity is the ‘Rafting Grounds’ near Dawsonville.

Unknown


1987.17.669

© 2012, New Brunswick Museum. All Rights Reserved.
View the complete media file

Learning Object Collection: Magnificent Rocks
Grand Falls, New Brunswick
Colour image of waterfall, trees and mountains
painting: Grand Falls, New Brunswick, c. 1890. One of the New Brunswick’s better-known scenic attractions exposes the underlying Ordovician geology. The gorge at Grand Falls cuts through the White Head Formation as the Saint John River drops 23 metres over one of the highest waterfalls in Atlantic Canada.

John Christopher Miles (1832-1911)
oil on canvas

1943.98

© 2012, New Brunswick Museum. All Rights Reserved.
View the complete media file

Learning Object Collection: Magnificent Rocks
St. George red granite: ‘column end’
Colour image of red rock with black, white and gray spots
St. George red granite: ‘column end’, Late Silurian to Devonian, St. George, New Brunswick, Collector: unknown. Natural stone has been used for thousands of years to create buildings and monuments. In the late 1800s New Brunswick red and black ‘granite from St. George was one of the best-known decorative stones in North America.

Unknown

Column length 20 cm
NBME 1152

© 2012, New Brunswick Museum. All Rights Reserved.
View the complete media file

Learning Object Collection: Magnificent Rocks
Fern Ledges and Marie Stopes, Part I
Dr. Randall Miller Research Curator, Geology and Palaeontology New Brunswick Museum
New Brunswick Museum
© 2013, New Brunswick Museum. All Rights Reserved.
Play the Video File

Learning Object Collection: Magnificent Rocks
Fern Ledges and Marie Stopes, Part II
Dr. Randall Miller Research Curator, Geology and Palaeontology New Brunswick Museum
New Brunswick Museum
© 2013, New Brunswick Museum. All Rights Reserved.
Play the Video File

Learning Object Collection: Magnificent Rocks

Learning Objectives

Curriculum Outcomes:

1. Integrate information from many sources to construct and communicate meaning.
2. Examine and create media products to help understand social, political and cultural values.