Armoured Warrior is a work of fiction based on the real-life experiences of Canadian tank crews that fought in North West Europe during the Second World War. Unlike their stories, however, YOU get to decide how this adventure will end. As the commander of a Sherman tank in the final days of the Normandy Campaign of 1944, you will live through some of the excitement, despair, brutality and sheer horror of one day’s fighting at the front.

Part history and part adventure story, Armoured Warrior is divided into sections. At the end of each section, you will be asked to make a choice. When you’ve decided what to do, you then click to the section you’ve chosen and read the outcome of your decision. A good decision will allow you to continue your adventure. A poor decision could spell trouble or, worse yet, entail fatal consequences for you and your crew. But don’t worry, you can always start over and try a new adventure. You should also keep in mind that not all decisions are life and death situations.

Throughout the story, you will come across many words and expressions that were quite common at the time. To help you understand what th Read More

Armoured Warrior is a work of fiction based on the real-life experiences of Canadian tank crews that fought in North West Europe during the Second World War. Unlike their stories, however, YOU get to decide how this adventure will end. As the commander of a Sherman tank in the final days of the Normandy Campaign of 1944, you will live through some of the excitement, despair, brutality and sheer horror of one day’s fighting at the front.

Part history and part adventure story, Armoured Warrior is divided into sections. At the end of each section, you will be asked to make a choice. When you’ve decided what to do, you then click to the section you’ve chosen and read the outcome of your decision. A good decision will allow you to continue your adventure. A poor decision could spell trouble or, worse yet, entail fatal consequences for you and your crew. But don’t worry, you can always start over and try a new adventure. You should also keep in mind that not all decisions are life and death situations.

Throughout the story, you will come across many words and expressions that were quite common at the time. To help you understand what these words mean, a glossary of terms has been included for all words typed in bold italics. Just click on the word to get a definition. You can then click back to continue your adventure.

In Armoured Warrior, there are two main objectives: the first is to capture and hold a vital crossroads behind enemy lines; the second, is merely to survive! Success will often depend on cunning, attention to detail and just plain common sense on your part. A fair amount of good luck doesn’t hurt either.

So mount up, start your engine and get ready for a truly unique experience.

Start the Adventure

Enhanced Version

HTML Version


© 2001, Canadian War Museum

When did tanks first appear on battlefields? For what reasons were they invented?
Research one of the individuals listed below and explain how he constributed to the development and/or application of armoured warfare.
a) Frank Worthington
b) Guy G. Simonds
c) Basil Liddell Hart
d) John F.C. Fuller
e) Ernest Swinton
f) George C. Patton
g) Heinz Guderian
List some of the major differences between tanks from the First World War and tanks from the Second World War.
If German tanks in the Normandy campaign were superior in quality to Allied tanks, how did the Allies manage to gain the upper hand in most battles?
During the Second World War, Canada produced several tanks including the Ram Tank. Research the Ram tank’s history and performance in the field.
How dangerous was it to be part of a tank crew? After reading the story, make a list of the hazards and perils facing tank crews in battle.
Read More
  1. When did tanks first appear on battlefields? For what reasons were they invented?
  2. Research one of the individuals listed below and explain how he constributed to the development and/or application of armoured warfare.
    a) Frank Worthington
    b) Guy G. Simonds
    c) Basil Liddell Hart
    d) John F.C. Fuller
    e) Ernest Swinton
    f) George C. Patton
    g) Heinz Guderian
  3. List some of the major differences between tanks from the First World War and tanks from the Second World War.
  4. If German tanks in the Normandy campaign were superior in quality to Allied tanks, how did the Allies manage to gain the upper hand in most battles?
  5. During the Second World War, Canada produced several tanks including the Ram Tank. Research the Ram tank’s history and performance in the field.
  6. How dangerous was it to be part of a tank crew? After reading the story, make a list of the hazards and perils facing tank crews in battle.
  7. What strategies could tank commanders use when deploying their tanks in open fields? Did this strategy differ when the tank was deployed in a town or city?
  8. If given a choice between a fast-moving light tank, a tank that is heavily armoured and a tank that is fitted with a powerful gun, which would you choose? Why?

© 2001, Canadian War Museum

Allies : Countries that fought against, especially, Germany, Japan and Italy during the Second World War. In the Normandy campaign, the Allied forces consisted mainly of Canadian, American, British, Polish and French troops.

bomb up : A popular expression, meaning to load ammunition on board a tank.

breech : The rear part of the gun that opens to allow rounds to be loaded and empty shell casings to be ejected.

brewed up : A popular expression, meaning to be destroyed; refers to the fire and smoke inside a tank resulting from the tank being penetrated by a shell.

bunker : A fortified strongpoint often built of concrete or sandbags and provided with openings from which its occupants might fire at passing targets.

Chattanooga Choo Choo : Big Band tune written by Glenn Miller in 1941 and performed by his orchestra.

cupola : The small, round structure atop a tank’s turret that provides the commander with a protected view of the surrounding area.

depress : To lower the gun; as opposed to elevate.

Dieppe : A French port on the Channel coast raided by 5000 Canadians on 19 August, 1942. Th Read More

Allies : Countries that fought against, especially, Germany, Japan and Italy during the Second World War. In the Normandy campaign, the Allied forces consisted mainly of Canadian, American, British, Polish and French troops.

bomb up : A popular expression, meaning to load ammunition on board a tank.

breech : The rear part of the gun that opens to allow rounds to be loaded and empty shell casings to be ejected.

brewed up : A popular expression, meaning to be destroyed; refers to the fire and smoke inside a tank resulting from the tank being penetrated by a shell.

bunker : A fortified strongpoint often built of concrete or sandbags and provided with openings from which its occupants might fire at passing targets.

Chattanooga Choo Choo : Big Band tune written by Glenn Miller in 1941 and performed by his orchestra.

cupola : The small, round structure atop a tank’s turret that provides the commander with a protected view of the surrounding area.

depress : To lower the gun; as opposed to elevate.

Dieppe : A French port on the Channel coast raided by 5000 Canadians on 19 August, 1942. The attack on the town’s German defenses ended in failure. To many Canadians, the name of the battle is synonymous with any type of military disaster.

echelon : A formation in which the tanks travel behind, and somewhat to the left or to the right, of each other.

88 : A versatile, high velocity, quick firing German anti-tank gun that was responsible for the loss of a high proportion of Allied tanks. The number refers to the width of the gun’s bore, which was 88mm across.

Falaise Gap : A large area in north-central France, between Falaise and Argentan, where Allied troops surrounded over 100,000 German troops, tanks and guns. The Gap refers to the weakest point of the Allied encirclement where the Germans desperately attempted to break through between 17-21 August 1944.

General Simonds : Lieutenant-General Guy Granville Simonds (1903-1974) was the Canadian officer in command of the 2nd Canadian Corps in Normandy. An imaginative and driven leader, he pioneered new armoured assault tactics during the Normandy campaign.

glacis : The front part of the tank that is sloped to help deflect incoming shells.

Glenn Miller : Famous American bandleader (1904-1944) whose orchestra epitomized the sound of the «swing» years.

HQ : Abbreviation for «headquarters».

Half-track : A military vehicle fitted with tracks where the rear wheels should be located; mainly used to carry infantry over terrain too rough for regular trucks.

In the Mood : Big Band tune written by Glenn Miller and performed by his orchestra; arguably the most popular song of the «swing era».

Iron Cross : A German decoration for bravery.

k.o. : Abbreviation for «knock out».

Little Brown Jug : Big Band tune written by Glenn Miller in 1940 and performed by his orchestra.

The Lincoln and Welland Regiment : A Canadian infantry unit raised in the Niagara peninsula in southern Ontario.

machine-gun nests : A defensive position, often reinforced with concrete or sandbags, from which a machine-gun could be set up to fire.

muzzle : The end of a weapon where the projectile is discharged.

Nazis : Members of the National Socialist German Workers Party founded by Adolf Hitler; during the war, the Allies frequently applied this term generally to describe their German enemy.

Normandy : A large area of nothern France and the scene of bitter fighting between Allied and German troops from the landings on the Normandy coast (6 June) to the closing of the Falaise Gap (21 August).

Panther : A type of German tank that best combined the elements of speed, firepower and mobility; arguably the best all-purpose tank of the Second World War.

Panzer : German word for armour.

range : The distance between a gun and its target or, alternatively, the maximum effective distance at which a weapon can fire at targets.

recovery vehicle : Any tracked and/or wheeled vehicle used to recover other vehicles or disabled tanks in view of having them repaired.

Le Régiment de la Chaudière : A Canadian infantry regiment from the south shore of the St. Lawrence east of Quebec City.

rifle : A small calibre precision shoulder weapon.

round : A single unit of ammunition, whether a rifle bullet or a heavy artillery shell.
squadron : A military unit consisting of 4 troops and a command element, or approximately 19 tanks, and normally commanded by a major.

SS Panzer Corps : An elite German armoured formation made up of personnel not administered by the regular German Army and having sworn a personal oath of allegiance to Adolf Hitler.

Siegfried Line : The German defensive line comprised of tank ditches, obstacles, bunkers and barbed wire, that runs from the Belgian border to the Swiss Alps.

sniper : A military marksman, armed with a rifle and usually well hidden, who shoots at selected targets of opportunity.

swastika : The symbol used by the Nazi party.

Tiger : A make of heavy German tank that combined superior firepower and armour. Although slow and prone to frequent breakdowns, the Tiger tended to dominate Allied tanks wherever it appeared.

the horn : Slang for «radio».

traverse : The act of rotating a tank’s turret to the right or left.

troop : A unit of 4 tanks, normally commanded by a lieutenant.

turret : The upper structure of a tank that can be rotated to aim the gun located within it.

Victoria Cross : The Commonwealth’s highest award for bravery in the face of the enemy.

Wehrmacht : The regular German army, as opposed to military units belonging to the SS.

Yank : A popular expression to designate Americans


© 2001, Canadian War Museum

Learning Objectives

The learner will:
  • find out more information about the final days of the Normandy Campaign of 1944;
  • identify at least 4 patches or badges used in the Second World War;
  • explain most of the terms used in the glossary.

Teachers' Centre Home Page | Find Learning Resources & Lesson Plans