Battle Honours: Second World War

Caen, Falaise, Falaise Road, Clair Tizon, The Laison, The Seine, 1944, Antwerp-Turnhout Canal, The Scheldt, Woensdrecht, South Beveland, The Rhineland, Twente Canal, Groningen, Oldenburg, North-West Europe, 1944-1945

Historical Sketch of the 14th Canadian Hussars in Normandy

Organized on 1 April 1910 in Swift Current, Saskatchewan, the regiment contributed to the raising of the 5th and 209th Battalions of the Canadian Expeditionary Force during the Great War of 1914-1918.

Mobilized for the Second World War in 1941, the unit became the divisional reconnaissance regiment of the 2nd Canadian Infantry Division. In this role they landed in Normandy on 6 July 1944.

As with its sister reconnaissance units in Normandy, the 12 Manitoba Dragoons and 17th Duke of York's RCH, the 8th Recce was tasked with obtaining information of the ground and the enemy for its formation commander. Unlike the two armoured reconnaissance regiments in First Canadian Army, the South Albertas and the 10th (Polish) Mounted Rifles, it was not expected to have to fight to obtain its informatio Read More

Battle Honours: Second World War

Caen, Falaise, Falaise Road, Clair Tizon, The Laison, The Seine, 1944, Antwerp-Turnhout Canal, The Scheldt, Woensdrecht, South Beveland, The Rhineland, Twente Canal, Groningen, Oldenburg, North-West Europe, 1944-1945

Historical Sketch of the 14th Canadian Hussars in Normandy

Organized on 1 April 1910 in Swift Current, Saskatchewan, the regiment contributed to the raising of the 5th and 209th Battalions of the Canadian Expeditionary Force during the Great War of 1914-1918.

Mobilized for the Second World War in 1941, the unit became the divisional reconnaissance regiment of the 2nd Canadian Infantry Division. In this role they landed in Normandy on 6 July 1944.

As with its sister reconnaissance units in Normandy, the 12 Manitoba Dragoons and 17th Duke of York's RCH, the 8th Recce was tasked with obtaining information of the ground and the enemy for its formation commander. Unlike the two armoured reconnaissance regiments in First Canadian Army, the South Albertas and the 10th (Polish) Mounted Rifles, it was not expected to have to fight to obtain its information although many times recce soldiers were forced to shoot their way out of trouble.

Following the Normandy campaign, the regiment fought in Belgium, Holland and Germany gaining distinction for its work in the liberation of Holland.

The regiment was placed on the Supplementary Order of Battle in 1964.

For further reading see: B.M. Always, Battle History of the Regiment, NP, ND. and John Marteinson and Michael McNorgan, The Royal Canadian Armoured Corps: An Illustrated History, Robin Brass Studio, 2000.


© 2001, Canadian War Museum

Crest

Crest

Canadian War Museum

© 2001, Canadian War Museum


Second World War Uniform Shoulder Flash

Second World War Uniform Shoulder Flash

Canadian War Museum

© 2001, Canadian War Museum


Battle Honours: Second World War

Caen, Falaise, The Laison, The Scheldt, Breskens Pocket, The Rhineland, The Rhine, Emmerich-Hoch Elten, Zutphen, Deventer, North-West Europe 1944-1945.

Historical Sketch of the 17th Duke of York's
Royal Canadian Hussars in Normandy

Raised as an independent cavalry troop in Montreal in 1879, the 17th Duke of York's Royal Canadian Hussars achieved regimental status in 1907. The regiment was mobilized for the Second World War on 1 September 1939, becoming a motorcycle unit. In 1941 they were designated as a reconnaissance unit being attached to the 3rd Canadian Infantry Division.

The regiment landed detachments in France on D-Day in support of the 3rd Division.

As with its sister reconnaissance units in Normandy, the 12th Manitoba Dragoons and the 8th Recce, the 17th Duke of York's RCH was tasked with obtaining information of the ground and the enemy for its formation commander. Unlike the two armoured reconnaissance regiments in First Canadian Army, the South Albertas and the 10th (Polish) Mounted Rifles, it was not expected to have to fight to obtain its Read More

Battle Honours: Second World War

Caen, Falaise, The Laison, The Scheldt, Breskens Pocket, The Rhineland, The Rhine, Emmerich-Hoch Elten, Zutphen, Deventer, North-West Europe 1944-1945.

Historical Sketch of the 17th Duke of York's
Royal Canadian Hussars in Normandy

Raised as an independent cavalry troop in Montreal in 1879, the 17th Duke of York's Royal Canadian Hussars achieved regimental status in 1907. The regiment was mobilized for the Second World War on 1 September 1939, becoming a motorcycle unit. In 1941 they were designated as a reconnaissance unit being attached to the 3rd Canadian Infantry Division.

The regiment landed detachments in France on D-Day in support of the 3rd Division.

As with its sister reconnaissance units in Normandy, the 12th Manitoba Dragoons and the 8th Recce, the 17th Duke of York's RCH was tasked with obtaining information of the ground and the enemy for its formation commander. Unlike the two armoured reconnaissance regiments in First Canadian Army, the South Albertas and the 10th (Polish) Mounted Rifles, it was not expected to have to fight to obtain its information although many times recce soldiers were forced to shoot their way out of trouble.

Following the Normandy campaign, the regiment fought in Belgium, Holland and Germany. After the ceasefire in Europe, the regiment was asked to form part of the Canadian Occupation Force from 1 June 1945 to 15 January 1946.

Amalgamated in 1958 with its sister regiment, the 6th Duke of Connaught's Royal Canadian Hussars, the unit today is known as the Royal Canadian Hussars (Montreal) and is a tank regiment in 34 Canadian Brigade Group.

For further reading see: W.G.H. Peavy, 7th Canadian Reconnaissance Regiment in World War II, the Regiment, Montreal, 1948, and John Marteinson and Michael McNorgan, The Royal Canadian Armoured Corps: An Illustrated History, Robin Brass Studio, 2000.


© 2001, Canadian War Museum

Crest

Crest

Canadian War Museum

© 2001, Canadian War Museum


Second World War Uniform Shoulder Flash

Second World War Uniform Shoulder Flash

Canadian War Museum

© 2001, Canadian War Museum


Battle Honours: Second World War

Falaise, Falaise Road, The Laison, Chambois, The Rhineland, Bad Zwischenahn, North-West Europe, 1944-1945.

Historical Sketch of the 12th Manitoba Dragoons in Normandy

Raised on 10 April 1885, in Winnipeg, the 12th Manitoba Dragoons carry battle honours for North West Canada 1885, where they served as the Winnipeg Battalion of Infantry, and South Africa 1900, as a result of their contribution of officers and men to the Canadian contingents.

During the Great War of 1914-1918, they helped to form the 5th and 32nd Battalions of the Canadian Expeditionary Force.

The regiment mobilized for the Second World War in 1941, embarking for the United Kingdom in September 1942. On 9 July 1944, it landed in Normandy, as the armoured car (reconnaissance) regiment of II Canadian Corps.

As with its sister reconnaissance units in Normandy, the 8th Recce and 17th Duke of York's RCH, the 12th Manitoba Dragoons was tasked with obtaining information of the ground and the enemy for its formation commander. Unlike the two armoured reconnaissance regiments in First Canadia Read More

Battle Honours: Second World War

Falaise, Falaise Road, The Laison, Chambois, The Rhineland, Bad Zwischenahn, North-West Europe, 1944-1945.

Historical Sketch of the 12th Manitoba Dragoons in Normandy

Raised on 10 April 1885, in Winnipeg, the 12th Manitoba Dragoons carry battle honours for North West Canada 1885, where they served as the Winnipeg Battalion of Infantry, and South Africa 1900, as a result of their contribution of officers and men to the Canadian contingents.

During the Great War of 1914-1918, they helped to form the 5th and 32nd Battalions of the Canadian Expeditionary Force.

The regiment mobilized for the Second World War in 1941, embarking for the United Kingdom in September 1942. On 9 July 1944, it landed in Normandy, as the armoured car (reconnaissance) regiment of II Canadian Corps.

As with its sister reconnaissance units in Normandy, the 8th Recce and 17th Duke of York's RCH, the 12th Manitoba Dragoons was tasked with obtaining information of the ground and the enemy for its formation commander. Unlike the two armoured reconnaissance regiments in First Canadian Army, the South Albertas and the 10th (Polish) Mounted Rifles, it was not expected to have to fight to obtain its information although many times recce soldiers were forced to shoot their way out of trouble.

Following the Normandy campaign, the regiment was conspicuous for its service in Holland, particularly during the winter of 1944/1945 when it patrolled the Maas river which formed the front line between the Canadian and German forces.

The regiment was placed on the Supplementary Order of Battle in 1964.

For further reading see: B. Tascona, 12th Manitoba Dragoons: A Tribute 1885 - 1991, Altona, Manitoba, 1991; and John Marteinson and Michael McNorgan, The Royal Canadian Armoured Corps: An Illustrated History, Robin Brass Studio, 2000.


© 2001, Canadian War Museum

Crest

Crest

Canadian War Museum

© 2001, Canadian War Museum


Second World War Uniform Shoulder Flash

Second World War Uniform Shoulder Flash

Canadian War Museum

© 2001, Canadian War Museum


Learning Objectives

The learner will:
  • find out more information about the final days of the Normandy Campaign of 1944;
  • identify at least 4 patches or badges used in the Second World War;
  • explain most of the terms used in the glossary.

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