The 10th Armoured Brigade was raised in 1937. It fought in southern Poland in 1939 under the command of Colonel Stanislaw Maczek, an officer of the regular Polish army. It was reformed in Scotland in 1942, after the fall of France, as a part of the 1st (Polish) Armoured Division which was commanded by the now Major-General Maczek. The Brigade's units were 1st (Polish) and 2nd (Polish) Armoured Regiments, the 24th Lancers and the 10th Dragoons as the Motor [infantry] Battalion. The Brigade's special celebratory date is 8 August, the anniversary of its first action in the Normandy campaign.

Following the Normandy campaign the unit saw action in Belgium, Holland and Germany. The cease-fire in May 1945 found them in northwestern Germany.

Today the brigade is a part of the 11th (Polish) Armoured Division stationed in Swictoszowie, Poland.

For further reading see: Stanislaw Maczek, Avec mes blindés, Paris: Presses de la Cité, 1967 and John Marteinson and Michael McNorgan, The Royal Canadian Armoured Corps: An Illustrated History, Robin Brass Studio, 2000.

The 10th Armoured Brigade was raised in 1937. It fought in southern Poland in 1939 under the command of Colonel Stanislaw Maczek, an officer of the regular Polish army. It was reformed in Scotland in 1942, after the fall of France, as a part of the 1st (Polish) Armoured Division which was commanded by the now Major-General Maczek. The Brigade's units were 1st (Polish) and 2nd (Polish) Armoured Regiments, the 24th Lancers and the 10th Dragoons as the Motor [infantry] Battalion. The Brigade's special celebratory date is 8 August, the anniversary of its first action in the Normandy campaign.

Following the Normandy campaign the unit saw action in Belgium, Holland and Germany. The cease-fire in May 1945 found them in northwestern Germany.

Today the brigade is a part of the 11th (Polish) Armoured Division stationed in Swictoszowie, Poland.

For further reading see: Stanislaw Maczek, Avec mes blindés, Paris: Presses de la Cité, 1967 and John Marteinson and Michael McNorgan, The Royal Canadian Armoured Corps: An Illustrated History, Robin Brass Studio, 2000.


© 2001, Canadian War Museum

Crest

Crest

Canadian War Museum

© 2001, Canadian War Museum


Battle Honours: Second World War

Soignolles, Jort, Maczuga, Goye, Baarle-Nassau, Breda, Made, Aschendorf, Ihren, Irhove 

Historical Sketch of the 1st (Polish) Armoured Regiment in Normandy

The 1st (Polish) Armoured Regiment was raised in France on 2 December 1939 as the 1st Tank Battalion. It fought under this name in the campaign in France in 1940. Members of the regiment reformed the unit in Scotland on 27 September 1941 after the fall of France, this time as the 65th Tank Battalion. Reformed on 13 August 1943 as the 1st Armoured Regiment, the unit landed in France in August 1944 as a part of the 10th (Polish) Armoured Brigade, 1st (Polish) Armoured Division. Its most memorable action was that fought at ’Maczuga’, otherwise known as Hill 262, on 19-22 August 1944 when the ’Falaise Gap’ was finally closed. This action is still commemorated annually by the regiment.

Following the Normandy campaign the unit saw action in Belgium, Holland and Germany. The cease-fire in May 1945 found them in northwestern Germany.

Today the regiment is a part of a modern 10th (Polis Read More

Battle Honours: Second World War

Soignolles, Jort, Maczuga, Goye, Baarle-Nassau, Breda, Made, Aschendorf, Ihren, Irhove 

Historical Sketch of the 1st (Polish) Armoured Regiment in Normandy

The 1st (Polish) Armoured Regiment was raised in France on 2 December 1939 as the 1st Tank Battalion. It fought under this name in the campaign in France in 1940. Members of the regiment reformed the unit in Scotland on 27 September 1941 after the fall of France, this time as the 65th Tank Battalion. Reformed on 13 August 1943 as the 1st Armoured Regiment, the unit landed in France in August 1944 as a part of the 10th (Polish) Armoured Brigade, 1st (Polish) Armoured Division. Its most memorable action was that fought at ’Maczuga’, otherwise known as Hill 262, on 19-22 August 1944 when the ’Falaise Gap’ was finally closed. This action is still commemorated annually by the regiment.

Following the Normandy campaign the unit saw action in Belgium, Holland and Germany. The cease-fire in May 1945 found them in northwestern Germany.

Today the regiment is a part of a modern 10th (Polish) Armoured Brigade stationed in Swietoszowie, Poland.

For further reading see: Stanislaw Maczek, Avec mes blindés, Paris: Presses de la Cité, 1967 and John Marteinson and Michael McNorgan, The Royal Canadian Armoured Corps: An Illustrated History, Robin Brass Studio, 2000.


© 2001, Canadian War Museum

Crest

Crest

Canadian War Museum

© 2001, Canadian War Museum


Collar Pennon

1st (Polish) Armoured Regiment Collar Pennon

Canadian War Museum

© 2001, Canadian War Museum


Battle Honours: Second World War

St. Aignan, Champeaux, Maczuga, Alphen, Ypres,
Hoogliede, Ruysselede, Ginneken i Breda, Kanal Mark,
Boertange, Rhede, Hessel

Historical Sketch of the 2nd (Polish) Armoured Regiment in Normandy

The 2nd (Polish) Armoured Regiment was raised in France on 29 January 1940 as the 2nd Tank Battalion and fought under this title in the French campaign of 1940. Members of the regiment reformed in Scotland on 13 November 1942 after the fall of France adopting the designation of 2nd Armoured Regiment. The reconstituted unit returned to France in late July 1944 as a part of the 10th (Polish) Armoured Brigade, 1st (Polish) Armoured Division. Its most memorable action in Normandy being it first, one fought at St. Aignan on 8 August 1944; a battle which is still commemorated annually by the regiment.

Following the Normandy campaign the unit saw action in Belgium, Holland and Germany. The cease-fire in May 1945 found them in northwestern Germany.

Today the regiment is a part of a modern 10th (Polish) Armoured Brigade stationed in Swietoszowie, Poland.

Read More

Battle Honours: Second World War

St. Aignan, Champeaux, Maczuga, Alphen, Ypres,
Hoogliede, Ruysselede, Ginneken i Breda, Kanal Mark,
Boertange, Rhede, Hessel

Historical Sketch of the 2nd (Polish) Armoured Regiment in Normandy

The 2nd (Polish) Armoured Regiment was raised in France on 29 January 1940 as the 2nd Tank Battalion and fought under this title in the French campaign of 1940. Members of the regiment reformed in Scotland on 13 November 1942 after the fall of France adopting the designation of 2nd Armoured Regiment. The reconstituted unit returned to France in late July 1944 as a part of the 10th (Polish) Armoured Brigade, 1st (Polish) Armoured Division. Its most memorable action in Normandy being it first, one fought at St. Aignan on 8 August 1944; a battle which is still commemorated annually by the regiment.

Following the Normandy campaign the unit saw action in Belgium, Holland and Germany. The cease-fire in May 1945 found them in northwestern Germany.

Today the regiment is a part of a modern 10th (Polish) Armoured Brigade stationed in Swietoszowie, Poland.

For further reading see: Stanislaw Maczek, Avec mes blindés, Paris: Presses de la Cité, 1967 and John Marteinson and Michael McNorgan, The Royal Canadian Armoured Corps: An Illustrated History, Robin Brass Studio, 2000.


© 2001, Canadian War Museum

Crest

Crest

Canadian War Museum

© 2001, Canadian War Museum


Collar Pennon

2nd (Polish) Armoured Regiment Collar Pennon

Canadian War Museum

© 2001, Canadian War Museum


Battle Honours: Second World War

Cramesnil, La Croix-Estrees, Fontaine-le-Pin, Morteaux-Coulibeuf, Le Menil Girard, Chambois, Blangy-Rouisseville, Arques, Thielt, Gandawa, Merxplas, Zondereigenz, Terover, Molenshot, Breda, Den Hout, Terhejden-Wagenberg, Moerdijk, Kusten Canal, Papenburg, Kollinghhorst

Historical Sketch of the 24th (Polish) Lancers in Normandy

The 24th Lancers were raised in Lwow (now in the Ukraine) on 6 July 1920 (a date still commemorated annually) under the title of 214 Volunteer Lancer Regiment. In March 1921 they were re-titled the 24th Lancers Regiment. This unit was a part of the 10th Armoured Brigade under the commanded of Colonel Stanislaw Maczek in 1939 and fought in the campaign of that year. In 1942 the regiment was reformed in Scotland. The reconstituted unit landed in France in late July 1944 as a part of the 10th (Polish) Armoured Brigade, 1st (Polish) Armoured Division.

Following the Normandy campaign the unit saw action in Belgium, Holland and Germany. The cease-fire in May 1945 found them in northwestern Germany.

Today the regiment is a part of a modern 10t Read More

Battle Honours: Second World War

Cramesnil, La Croix-Estrees, Fontaine-le-Pin, Morteaux-Coulibeuf, Le Menil Girard, Chambois, Blangy-Rouisseville, Arques, Thielt, Gandawa, Merxplas, Zondereigenz, Terover, Molenshot, Breda, Den Hout, Terhejden-Wagenberg, Moerdijk, Kusten Canal, Papenburg, Kollinghhorst

Historical Sketch of the 24th (Polish) Lancers in Normandy

The 24th Lancers were raised in Lwow (now in the Ukraine) on 6 July 1920 (a date still commemorated annually) under the title of 214 Volunteer Lancer Regiment. In March 1921 they were re-titled the 24th Lancers Regiment. This unit was a part of the 10th Armoured Brigade under the commanded of Colonel Stanislaw Maczek in 1939 and fought in the campaign of that year. In 1942 the regiment was reformed in Scotland. The reconstituted unit landed in France in late July 1944 as a part of the 10th (Polish) Armoured Brigade, 1st (Polish) Armoured Division.

Following the Normandy campaign the unit saw action in Belgium, Holland and Germany. The cease-fire in May 1945 found them in northwestern Germany.

Today the regiment is a part of a modern 10th (Polish) Armoured Brigade stationed in Swietoszowie, Poland.

For further reading see: Stanislaw Maczek, Avec mes blindés, Paris: Presses de la Cité, 1967 and John Marteinson and Michael McNorgan, The Royal Canadian Armoured Corps: An Illustrated History, Robin Brass Studio, 2000.


© 2001, Canadian War Museum

Crest

Crest

Canadian War Museum

© 2001, Canadian War Museum


Collar Pennon

24th (Polish) Lancers Collar Pennon

Canadian War Museum

© 2001, Canadian War Museum


Learning Objectives

The learner will:
  • find out more information about the final days of the Normandy Campaign of 1944;
  • identify at least 4 patches or badges used in the Second World War;
  • explain most of the terms used in the glossary.

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